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Portraits of 'Kings'
HOLDEN, Bryan & LEECH, Kenneth H
Fraser Stewart
ISBN 10: 0903485931
ISBN 13: 9780903485937

There are 2 copies of this book available.
Portraits of ’Kings’
Holden, Bryan & Leech, Kenneth H.      
ISBN: 0903485931
Moorland Publishing Company Stafford, England 1984 Third Edition  Laminated Pictorial Boards unpaginated approx 60 pages b/w photos line drawings  Very Good/No Jacket
Price: $30.00 (AUD)
Book Number: 6845
Bookseller: Train World Pty Ltd  
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Portraits of ’Kings’ : Portraits of Every Western Region King Class Locomotive in Single and Double Chimney Form, with Footplate Comments
Holden, Bryan & Leech, Kenneth H.      
ISBN: 0903485931
Moorland Publishing Company Stafford, England 1979 First Edition  Laminated Pictorial Boards unpaginated approx 60 pages b/w photos line drawings - The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King is a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King. This class was designed under the direction of C. B. Collett, as an enlarged version of Collett's Castle Class, which in turn was an enlargement of George Jackson Churchward's Star Class. Churchward had proposed fitting the 6ft diameter boiler used on his 4700 Class 2-8-0 on to a 4-6-0 chassis in 1919 to create a more powerful express locomotive, but had been prevented from doing so due to weight restrictions on several bridges on the GWR main line. Collett's Castle class of 1923 was therefore a compromise with a 5' 6" boiler. However, bridge strengthening and a better understanding of the impact of hammer blow on structures brought about by the work of the 'Bridge Stress Committee' set up by the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research led to the relaxation of these restrictions. The new design was partly to meet future traffic requirements, but was also a response to the Great Western Railway publicity department's desire to regain the title of having the 'most powerful express passenger steam locomotive in Britain', which had been taken from the Castle Class in 1926 by the Southern Railway Lord Nelson Class. The engines, as originally designed, delivered 39,700 lbf (177,000 N) tractive effort, with 16-inch bore by 28-inch stroke cylinders and 250 pounds per square inch (1.72 MPa) boiler. At a request from Sir Felix Pole, the Great Western's General Manager, to get the tractive effort up to above 40,000 lbf (a major goalpost), the cylinders were enlarged to 16 1/4-inch bore, bringing the figure up to 40,300 lbf (179,000 N). This increase was removed on all members of the class at their first major overhaul. The distinctive design of the leading bogie (with outside bearings on the fore wheel and inside bearings on the rear wheel) was to allow for these larger cylinders. The first, No. 6000 King George V, appeared in 1927 and was sent on a tour of North America, for the Centenary celebrations of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O), where its sleek appearance and smooth performance impressed all who witnessed it. The application of pressurised oil lubrication showed its advantages over the largely grease-lubricated American Locomotives, and was even incorporated into a later design for the B&O in 1928. King George V was presented with a brass bell to mark the occasion. The original scheme for the Kings had been to name them after cathedrals, but when the US trip was planned it was felt that a more unmistakably British icon was needed. During planning and construction the engine was dubbed the 'Super-Castle'  Very Good/No Jacket
Price: $33.00 (AUD)
Book Number: 6846
Bookseller: Train World Pty Ltd  
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